Tag Archives: Damascus

New Takes in Old Damascus 1982

We have crossed in from the Mediterranean at Latakia, taken a wide arcing turn south and are now slowly descending over the tan steppe into mankind’s favorite oasis. And at what appear to be an hour before schedule, if schedule is the proper word for anything gliding, tumbling, stumbling or crawling into the Syrian Arab […]

The Feast of St. Joseph 1975

“Angelica. Angelica Henlein,” Kessler shouted over the phone. I was standing at a public phone in the Beirut airport. I was astonished that the phone worked, that I had the right Lebanese coins, and even more astonished that when I dialed my old friend and guide Heinz Kessler in Beirut, he simply picked up the […]

A Dig at Heraqleh 1979

Father Flanagan, the cleric portrayed by Spencer Tracer in “Boystown,” reportedly said that there was no such thing as a bad boy. I don’t know about boys, being one myself even at this advanced age, but I know a lot about ideas since I’ve had a few, and I can attest that there are assuredly […]

A Guide for the Perplexed 1970

Before there was Lawrence of Arabia, there was Charles M. Doughty. Odd, but there it is: I stumbled over the horse before the flamboyant cart. At age twenty-five, in St. Louis, Missouri, remote from both desert and oasis, I opened a book and read: A new voice hailed me of an old friend when, first […]